August 2019 Quickie Reviews

This month was TCM’s annual Summer Under the Stars when they spend 24 hours each day honoring a different classic film actor. I made it a point to watch films featuring Ava Gardner, Melvyn Douglas, Shirley Temple, Buster Keaton and a couple of hard to find titles starring Irene Dunne. By default  I also saw a few more of Randolph Scott’s and Robert Young’s films.

August  2019 Breakdown
  • 29 films/series total
  • 18 new classic films
  • 5 TV series
  • 3 re-watches
  • 2 documentaries
Photo Source: IMDb

Favorite Discovery: The Indian Doctor and Wee Willie Winkie

Biggest Disappointment: Pandora and the Flying Dutchman Continue reading “August 2019 Quickie Reviews”

April 2019 Quickie Reviews

April was pretty busy for me as I watched 35 titles. Among these, one was a new theater release, one was a new Netflix release, one was a documentary. I saw six silent films, twenty two new to me classic titles including one foreign classic, re-watched six films for at least the second time and viewed three television series.

TCM chose to honor Greta Garbo this month, so I was able to catch seven of her films (including the documentary). My favorite of those was Love, a remake of Anna Karenina with John Gilbert. But I also discovered that I enjoy watching her opposite Nils Asther as well.

Kay Frances was also honored for a day this month and I saw six more of her movies. She was definitely at her best in the pre-code era.

Garbo and Asther in The Single Standard
Photo Source: IMDb.com

Some of my favorite discoveries this month include Garbo and Asther in The Single Standard, the silent film Souls for Sale, the BBC’s mini-series Mrs. Wilson, The Teahouse of the August Moon and Kay Francis in The House on 56th Street. Continue reading “April 2019 Quickie Reviews”

February 2019 Quickie Film Reviews

February didn’t prove to be a very productive month for me in watching films and series. Of course it is a short month and I was busier than usual, so I’m cutting myself some slack.

I finished fourteen films and two series in February, that includes a mix of classic and contemporary entertainment. I revisited some old favorites (Gone With the Wind, My Fair Lady and The Quiet Man), and watched some creative Shakespeare adaptations.

Cheers For Miss Bishop Photo Source: TCM.com

My favorite discoveries this month are the sweet classic Cheers for Miss Bishop and the extremely cute Netflix film To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before. Continue reading “February 2019 Quickie Film Reviews”

Film Review -The Promise (2017)

 

The Promise is set in the last days of the Ottoman Empire, now Turkey, during the early years of World War I. Young Mikael Boghosian comes from a family of apothecaries, but his real dream is to leave his mountain village to attend medical school in Constantinople so that he can return to doctor his people. This dream has always been out of reach. That is until he betroths himself to a local girl in order to gain her dowry for the school fees. He plans to complete a three-year medical degree in two, and then return home to marry her. He believes he will learn to love her eventually.

In Constantinople, Mikael boards with a wealthy relative. Then he meets Ana  a fellow Armenian raised in Paris who has returned to her home country with her American reporter boyfriend Chris Myers. Although an immediate attraction between Mikael and Ana stirs…

To read the full review, please follow me over to The Silver Petticoat Review.

Reviewing a Family Favorite -The Man From Snowy River

An Australian western set in the 1880’s, The Man From Snowy River is the story of young Jim Craig who was born and raised in the mountains. After an accident that kills his father that also leads to Jim’s horse escaping to run free with a pack of wild horses, Jim must leave the family homestead to seek work and respect in the lowlands.

He finds a job with wealthy cattle rancher Harrison and meets Jessica, Harrison’s strong willed daughter. The boss assigns Jim to menial tasks, earning disdain from other ranch hands. But he finds relief in his developing friendship with the boss’s daughter who shares his love for horses.

When Jim and Jessica make the risky decision to break and train Harrison’s new and expensive colt, it leads to a confrontation with Harrison. Jim is fired and Jessica runs away from her father’s harsh hand and the threat of finishing school.

Jealous ranch hands then frame Jim for the release of the colt. Jim must prove his honor and integrity by rescuing Jessica and also recovering the colt which now runs with the Brumbies. This is the same group of wild horses which his own horse has joined and which has roamed freely for many years.

To read the remainder of my review for this beloved film, please follow me over to The Silver Petticoat Review.

Film Review -Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

Welcome back to director Mel Gibson. It has been ten years since he last directed a film and boy did he pick a great story for his return.

SUMMARY

Hacksaw Ridge tells the true story of Desmond Doss, a medic who served in WWII but who refused to carry a weapon.

Desmond Doss grows up in a home with an alcoholic father whose experiences in WWI haunt both him and his household. Thanks to his religious beliefs and a few personal experiences including a confrontation with his own father, Desmond is adamantly opposed to violence.These views are severely challenged when he joins the army as a “conscientious co-operator”. He feels compelled to be a part of the war, but refuses to carry a weapon. As a medic he wants to help save lives, but the Army does not know what to do with a soldier who won’t even touch a gun. Continue reading “Film Review -Hacksaw Ridge (2016)”